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  Weekly Feature (November 5, 2006)
 


Remembrance Day
by
Dina

 

(Quiz on Remembrance Day Vocabulary)

On November 11, Canadians honour the men and women who were killed in two World Wars, the Korean War and United Nations Peace Keeping Missions. All across Canada, people observe or take part in ceremonies to show their respect. These ceremonies take place at cenotaphs and war memorials in towns and cities throughout Canada. At 11:00 A.M., people observe two minutes of silence to remember those who served Canada in times of war.

Approximately two weeks before Remembrance Day, people wear red poppies to show that they have not forgotten the brave Canadians who died. Poppies grew in fields where many soldiers were killed. During World War 1, Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian army doctor, wrote a famous poem called "In Flanders Fields." When he saw the poppies blooming around the soldiers' graves, he was inspired to write this poem.

From November 5-11, the Government of Canada will mark Veterans' Week 2006 with events and activities across the country. With this year's theme, "Share the Story," Canadians, especially youth, will be encouraged to learn more about Canada's Veterans, to reflect on the service and sacrifice of any Veterans, and to share their thoughts on remembrance with their peers and families.

On Saturday, November 11, you can watch the ceremonies on television or attend a service in your community.

To read more about Remembrance Day, go to the following sites:

Remembrance Day Links
Good place to start your search for Remembrance Day

Learn all about the poppy

 

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