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  Weekly Feature (January 28, 2007)
 


Groundhog Day
February 2, 2007
 by
Cheryl

 

 

We have had one of the worst winters in many years. Everyone has talked about the unbelievable wind, rain, and snow. Now, after the darkest days of winter, we wish for spring sun and flowers.

The big question is will spring come before the equinox? For many years people have watched small hibernating animals to see if they wake up early. This in an indication that spring will be early. Groundhog Day originated from this idea.

Groundhog Day is just around the corner. What will the groundhog see when he pops his head out? Shadow or no shadow? Will winter end soon or it will it drag on for another six weeks?

What can we do to celebrate this day and my number one pressing question: why did we start looking to a groundhog to answer our weather questions? Let's take a look at this holiday!

Legend said that if this day was fair (sunny), then the second-half of winter would be stormy. In their native land of Germany, the Germans looked at a badger to see if they could see his shadow. When they settled in North America in Pennsylvania, the local Indians had a great respect for groundhogs so they substituted a groundhog for the badger.

And as they say, the rest is history so now every February 2, everyone looks to a small town in Pennsylvania for a weather prediction!

Groundhog Day Rule With the Groundhog Seeing His Shadow

If the groundhog sees his shadow, we have 6 more weeks of winter.
If the groundhog does not see his shadow, winter will end soon.

Learn more about groundhogs

Learn more about Groundhog Day.

 

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Grade 11 and 12 Courses for February to June 2007

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